Lovell Historical Society

Lovell Barn Tour

Today, most barns in Lovell are not "working" barns. Sure they may hold tractors, tools, equipment and lots of stuff, but chances are strong that the barn was not constructed for that purpose. Purists may question the different use but it is probably the evolving uses of these large structures that have helped to save them from destruction.

The exteriors of the barns are always fascinating to look at and admire, but it is the interiors that tell the real story. The type of construction, how many levels, what type of animals were stored there and what sort of changes were made over the decades.

This Sunday, the Lovell Historical Society is providing the opportunity for everyone to satisfy their curiosity as to just what is in that barn that you are always driving by! There will be eight pre-Civil War barns available to visit, examine and admire. A variety of styles and sizes including a former dairy barn with two interior silos and an existing working barn housing pigs and cattle.

After the tour, participants are invited to attend a cocktail party at the Pleasant Point Inn where there will be entertainment, hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar. Tickets for this event are $20, available at the Historical Society. The Barn Tour is from 1-4 with the Cocktail Party from 4-6. Call 207-925-3234.

For more information on Maine barns, please visit Don Perkins' web site 'Our Barns'.

Lovell Barn Tour

Today, most barns in Lovell are not "working" barns. Sure they may hold tractors, tools, equipment and lots of stuff, but chances are strong that the barn was not constructed for that purpose. Purists may question the different use but it is probably the evolving uses of these large structures that have helped to save them from destruction.

The exteriors of the barns are always fascinating to look at and admire, but it is the interiors that tell the real story. The type of construction, how many levels, what type of animals were stored there and what sort of changes were made over the decades.

This Sunday, the Lovell Historical Society is providing the opportunity for everyone to satisfy their curiosity as to just what is in that barn that you are always driving by! There will be eight pre-Civil War barns available to visit, examine and admire. A variety of styles and sizes including a former dairy barn with two interior silos and an existing working barn housing pigs and cattle.

After the tour, participants are invited to attend a cocktail party at the Pleasant Point Inn where there will be entertainment, hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar. Tickets for this event are $20, available at the Historical Society. The Barn Tour is from 1-4 with the Cocktail Party from 4-6. Call 207-925-3234.

For more information on Maine barns, please visit Don Perkins' web site 'Our Barns'.

North Lovell Conversations

The Lovell Historical Society is proud to present "North Lovell Conversations" this Sunday, July 8th at 1 pm.

Five members of North Lovell's community will participate in a roundtable discussion about the development of this unique area of town. Until the advancement of transportation, North Lovell was an isolated community with its own industry and schools. The area has witnessed major changes over time, particularly as a result of the growth of tourism.

Jo Radner, past president of the American Folklore Society and the National Storytelling Network, will moderate the discussion. Panel members include Fred Fox, Jack Hawley, Cliff Hill, Bill Lord & Ruth Mitchell.

Come listen to these five storytellers recount life in North Lovell. Audience members will be encouraged to join in the discussion. The program will be held at the Grange Hall on Route 5 next to the Lewis Dana Memorial Library. Admission is FREE!

Thanks to Pam Bliss for her hard work in organizing this discussion. Refreshments, courtesy of Kezar Realty, will be served after the event. For more information, call 207-925-3234.

Comments

  1. sweetmeow on

    I wish I'd been there for these discussions, as it might have brought back interesting memories of my childhood coming up to North Lovell. Our cabins are on the north end of the lake in north bay. we would shop for groceries at the North Lovell store, sometimes taking our motor boat over to the town landing and walking to the store with the little red wagon to carry the groceries back to the boat. I remember taking books out of the library when it first opened, and picking up our mail at the North Lovell post office, where it was forwarded from home. I wish I could remember the post mistress' name... But I can't. Maybe my sisters can...? We will be up for 10 days as of July 18th. I can't wait to feel Kezar's refreshing waters....!
    • Stanley Tupaj on

      I was very pleased with how it came out. There were plenty of good stories and Jo Radner, the moderator, did a terrific job of weaving the stories together. The Historical Society will be putting DVD's together for sale. Perfect time to be coming to town. The weather has been outstanding! (which we deserve after several weeks of steady rain)

      North Lovell Conversations

      The Lovell Historical Society is proud to present "North Lovell Conversations" this Sunday, July 8th at 1 pm.

      Five members of North Lovell's community will participate in a roundtable discussion about the development of this unique area of town. Until the advancement of transportation, North Lovell was an isolated community with its own industry and schools. The area has witnessed major changes over time, particularly as a result of the growth of tourism.

      Jo Radner, past president of the American Folklore Society and the National Storytelling Network, will moderate the discussion. Panel members include Fred Fox, Jack Hawley, Cliff Hill, Bill Lord & Ruth Mitchell.

      Come listen to these five storytellers recount life in North Lovell. Audience members will be encouraged to join in the discussion. The program will be held at the Grange Hall on Route 5 next to the Lewis Dana Memorial Library. Admission is FREE!

      Thanks to Pam Bliss for her hard work in organizing this discussion. Refreshments, courtesy of Kezar Realty, will be served after the event. For more information, call 207-925-3234.

      Winter Wood Cutting

      Who would have ever thought that on New Year's Day 2012, that Albert and I would still have the opportunity to bring the tractor and truck into the woods, cut six trees down and drag them up to the wood pile? This time of year is usually limited to splitting the collected wood and getting it ready for drying. The fact that we are able to add to the pile is a bonus.

      I don't claim to be proficient with the chain saw and leave most of that skill to Albert. I'm very happy to be the laborer--lifting the cut pieces into the pick-up truck or wrapping the chains around the big sticks and dragging them to a cleared area branch trimming.

      I have nothing but respect for the workers who are out in the woods everyday. Yes, they have great mechanical equipment to assist them but logging is still hard and dangerous work. I never tire of hearing stories about Albert's father, Marcus, and Uncle Burton spending their winter days cutting four cords of wood every day by hand and hauling them out with horses! During our wood-cutting season, I'm feeling major aches and pains from just two hours a day and a couple of days each week!

      Thanks to the Lovell Historical Society for the picture of Carlton Merrill and Fred Stearns.

      Comments

      1. Jonna on

        A blogger and a logger! You are a man of many and varied talents!
        • Stanley Tupaj on

          Winner of the "Best Comment of 2012"!

          Winter Wood Cutting

          Who would have ever thought that on New Year's Day 2012, that Albert and I would still have the opportunity to bring the tractor and truck into the woods, cut six trees down and drag them up to the wood pile? This time of year is usually limited to splitting the collected wood and getting it ready for drying. The fact that we are able to add to the pile is a bonus.

          I don't claim to be proficient with the chain saw and leave most of that skill to Albert. I'm very happy to be the laborer--lifting the cut pieces into the pick-up truck or wrapping the chains around the big sticks and dragging them to a cleared area branch trimming.

          I have nothing but respect for the workers who are out in the woods everyday. Yes, they have great mechanical equipment to assist them but logging is still hard and dangerous work. I never tire of hearing stories about Albert's father, Marcus, and Uncle Burton spending their winter days cutting four cords of wood every day by hand and hauling them out with horses! During our wood-cutting season, I'm feeling major aches and pains from just two hours a day and a couple of days each week!

          Thanks to the Lovell Historical Society for the picture of Carlton Merrill and Fred Stearns.

          The Fall Harvest

          Now that the cooler mornings and evenings confirm that summer is in the rear-view mirror, what better way to celebrate Autumn than by visiting the Lovell Historical Society this Sunday, October 16th. From 1-4, the Society presents the The Fall Harvest, where there will be something for all members of the family.

          Children will be able to enjoy a petting zoo and to paint pumpkins for free. A cider press will be in operation and making cider with apples donated by Sweden's Pietree Orchard. Inside the historic Kimball-Stanford House, there will be many activities, including a large bake sale, a weaving and spinning demonstration plus an abundant refreshment table to enjoy. The museum will also be open for viewing. Birds On A Wire will be performing traditional "fiddle" music in the large barn.

          Except for the baked goodies that you will want to purchase and bring home, the entire afternoon is free and open to the public!

          The Fall Harvest

          Now that the cooler mornings and evenings confirm that summer is in the rear-view mirror, what better way to celebrate Autumn than by visiting the Lovell Historical Society this Sunday, October 16th. From 1-4, the Society presents the The Fall Harvest, where there will be something for all members of the family.

          Children will be able to enjoy a petting zoo and to paint pumpkins for free. A cider press will be in operation and making cider with apples donated by Sweden's Pietree Orchard. Inside the historic Kimball-Stanford House, there will be many activities, including a large bake sale, a weaving and spinning demonstration plus an abundant refreshment table to enjoy. The museum will also be open for viewing. Birds On A Wire will be performing traditional "fiddle" music in the large barn.

          Except for the baked goodies that you will want to purchase and bring home, the entire afternoon is free and open to the public!