Lovell Historical Society

West Lovell Conversations

Kezar Realty is proud to be a partner with the Lovell Historical Society for this Saturday's "West Lovell Conversations". Four of West Lovell's prominent citizens will participate in a round table discussion about the development of this unique area. Once isolated as a separate community, West Lovell has witnessed major changes over time with the growth of tourism and the expansion of its year-round population.

Albert Stearns and his older sister, Marcia Hamlin will take part in the discussion. They grew up in West Lovell, the children of Marcus and Esther, on the Stearns family farm. Byron Shaw was born and raised in West Lovell, growing up on Foxboro Road and working at various mills in the region. Ron Leavitt, although not born in Lovell, has been a student of West Lovell for years.

Come listen as these four storytellers recount life in West Lovell. The program, which starts at 1:00 pm, will be held at the Historical Society's 1839 Kimball-Stanford House. Admission is free and members of the audience will be encouraged to join in the discussion before refreshments are served.

West Lovell Conversations

Kezar Realty is proud to be a partner with the Lovell Historical Society for this Saturday's "West Lovell Conversations". Four of West Lovell's prominent citizens will participate in a round table discussion about the development of this unique area. Once isolated as a separate community, West Lovell has witnessed major changes over time with the growth of tourism and the expansion of its year-round population.

Albert Stearns and his older sister, Marcia Hamlin will take part in the discussion. They grew up in West Lovell, the children of Marcus and Esther, on the Stearns family farm. Byron Shaw was born and raised in West Lovell, growing up on Foxboro Road and working at various mills in the region. Ron Leavitt, although not born in Lovell, has been a student of West Lovell for years.

Come listen as these four storytellers recount life in West Lovell. The program, which starts at 1:00 pm, will be held at the Historical Society's 1839 Kimball-Stanford House. Admission is free and members of the audience will be encouraged to join in the discussion before refreshments are served.

Lovell Town Hall

The work of Fox and Sons is on prominent display on Route 5 in Center Lovell. The Town Hall, built in 1796 and used for town meetings since 1801 (Lovewell's Town: From Howling Wilderness to Vacationland in Trust Robert C. Williams p197), has been in need of serious restoration for years. Constructing a foundation and resetting the building is just the first step in the process which will proceed as funds become available. Note that the solid red brick safe is still standing on its own.

Hopefully, the building will be ready for the 2012 town meeting, held on the first Saturday in March!

From the Lovell Historical Society: The Lovell Town Meetinghouse in 1938. The photo was used in the publication "The Lovell News" with the following caption: "The Meeting House, pictured above, was completed in 1796. Designed as a church, its original height was two and one-half stories. The building was deemed too high and drafty for winter use and in 1827 it was cut down to its present height. In 1852, it was no longer used as a church as separate church buildings had been constructed. The pews were removed and around 1890 the old pulpit and balcony were taken down. Today, the building continues to be used for town meetings."

Comments

  1. Jim Rowe on

    interesting, Stan.
    • Stanley Tupaj on

      Jim, Thanks. I've been thinking that it would be nice to show photos of all the different barn work that has been done in Lovell this summer--including yours!

      Lovell Town Hall

      The work of Fox and Sons is on prominent display on Route 5 in Center Lovell. The Town Hall, built in 1796 and used for town meetings since 1801 (Lovewell's Town: From Howling Wilderness to Vacationland in Trust Robert C. Williams p197), has been in need of serious restoration for years. Constructing a foundation and resetting the building is just the first step in the process which will proceed as funds become available. Note that the solid red brick safe is still standing on its own.

      Hopefully, the building will be ready for the 2012 town meeting, held on the first Saturday in March!

      From the Lovell Historical Society: The Lovell Town Meetinghouse in 1938. The photo was used in the publication "The Lovell News" with the following caption: "The Meeting House, pictured above, was completed in 1796. Designed as a church, its original height was two and one-half stories. The building was deemed too high and drafty for winter use and in 1827 it was cut down to its present height. In 1852, it was no longer used as a church as separate church buildings had been constructed. The pews were removed and around 1890 the old pulpit and balcony were taken down. Today, the building continues to be used for town meetings."

      Lovell Historical Society's House Tour 2011

      This Sunday, August 14th, you will have an opportunity to see four of Lovell's historic homes. This popular fundraiser for the Lovell Historical Society is held every other year and current owners permit ticket holders to walk around the interior of homes. The tour is from 1-4 pm and tickets may be purchased at the Historical Society. Maps and directions will be available. Cost is $20 per person.

      The four homes on the tour are:

      1) Mill Brook Farm (2044 Main Street) in North Lovell. 2) Tam Glen (Severance Lodge Road) in Center Lovell. 3) Parker-Libby Farmstead (71 Old Waterford Road) Lovell. 4) Lovell Village Schoolhouse (172 Main Street) Lovell Village.

      Refreshments will be served at the Kimball-Stanford House, the Historical Society's home, from 4-5 pm.

      Comments

      1. sweetmeow on

        Even though I struggle with dial up at our camp -- I want to let you know that we really enjoyed the house tour today! I'm so glad that our time on Kezar corresponded with this event. Loved each house for something different ... I had no favorite because you cannot compare apples and oranges. They were each unique
        • Stanley Tupaj on

          Isn't it great to see the inside of a house that you pass by all of the time? I'm glad that you enjoyed the tour!

          Lovell Historical Society's House Tour 2011

          This Sunday, August 14th, you will have an opportunity to see four of Lovell's historic homes. This popular fundraiser for the Lovell Historical Society is held every other year and current owners permit ticket holders to walk around the interior of homes. The tour is from 1-4 pm and tickets may be purchased at the Historical Society. Maps and directions will be available. Cost is $20 per person.

          The four homes on the tour are:

          1) Mill Brook Farm (2044 Main Street) in North Lovell. 2) Tam Glen (Severance Lodge Road) in Center Lovell. 3) Parker-Libby Farmstead (71 Old Waterford Road) Lovell. 4) Lovell Village Schoolhouse (172 Main Street) Lovell Village.

          Refreshments will be served at the Kimball-Stanford House, the Historical Society's home, from 4-5 pm.

          Sunday's Antique Show

          The 12th Annual Antique Show & Auction at the Lovell Historical Society, held this past Sunday, was a success. The new format, with the Live Auction held earlier in the day, seemed to work for everyone. The antique dealers were scattered throughout the historic Kimball-Stanford House and in the field. The dealers provided a variety of attractive and affordable goods for sale.

          The auction began just after 11 under sunny skies and all seats were filled. Jay Hanson, Fryeburg Fair Auctioneer, successfully sold a number of exiting items, all of which were donated to the Society. Some of the more enticing prizes were Red Sox tickets, an airplane ride over Kezar Lake, Harvest Gold Jewelry, dinner at the Center Lovell Inn and a private dinner and beer cellar tour at Ebenezer's Pub. Molloy Energy donated 200 gallons of heating oil and Harry Nyberg had his truck filled with two cords of wood waiting to be delivered to the winning bidder.

          After the auction, the dealers were busy with browsers and people lined up to buy lunch and to eat under the shady trees. In all aspects, the day was spectacular and successful!

          Sunday's Antique Show

          The 12th Annual Antique Show & Auction at the Lovell Historical Society, held this past Sunday, was a success. The new format, with the Live Auction held earlier in the day, seemed to work for everyone. The antique dealers were scattered throughout the historic Kimball-Stanford House and in the field. The dealers provided a variety of attractive and affordable goods for sale.

          The auction began just after 11 under sunny skies and all seats were filled. Jay Hanson, Fryeburg Fair Auctioneer, successfully sold a number of exiting items, all of which were donated to the Society. Some of the more enticing prizes were Red Sox tickets, an airplane ride over Kezar Lake, Harvest Gold Jewelry, dinner at the Center Lovell Inn and a private dinner and beer cellar tour at Ebenezer's Pub. Molloy Energy donated 200 gallons of heating oil and Harry Nyberg had his truck filled with two cords of wood waiting to be delivered to the winning bidder.

          After the auction, the dealers were busy with browsers and people lined up to buy lunch and to eat under the shady trees. In all aspects, the day was spectacular and successful!