Weather

Hurricane Irene, Part Two

A beautiful summer day in Lovell. Nothing unusual about that at the end of August except for the hum of generators throughout town. Lovell Village is in good shape (if only I had a shower in the office) but numerous sections of town are without power. Wires and poles were taken down by falling trees. Thankfully, I haven't seen any damaged cars or houses.

I had the pleasure of driving to Portland at 2 am this morning and on the ride along RT 302 there were many miles where it was clear that there was no power. Even in Westbrook which abuts Portland. And the CMP crews were not seen (understandable since it was still windy, wet and dark). That suggests to me that Lovell and the surrounding areas might not get immediate attention.

Over the years, one learns quickly that although you may be frustrated with not having power, there is nothing you can do. Except maybe go visit a neighbor who has one of those generators humming!

P.S. One benefit of being on the road so early in the morning that we got back to Lovell at 5 am--just as Rosie's was opening and were her first patrons of the day!

Comments

  1. sweetmeow on

    We've left Maine for 2011 - - about 6 days before Hurricane Irene's arrival. My sister in law was in camp when it hit - but ended up leaving as our (non drinking) water supply (pumped from the lake) and toilets require electricity, and it didn't appear that it would be restored anytime soon. (we have spring water for drinking) It reminded me of our time up there during Hurricane Bob in 1991. We had chemical toilets back then, so we weathered the storm -- and the power outage quite nicely. We live on eastern Long Island, and just had our power restored, so all is well for us here. Our time in camp was magical this year - especially because of my sister's wedding on the 20th. We had a few days of rain, but except for that - we had perfect weather. I've sort of let my blog go, but want to reinstate it - with some Kezar talk. I tried to stop in to see you - but at the time you weren't there, and didn't manage to get back.
    • Stanley Tupaj on

      I'm sorry that I missed you! Next year when you return. I'm glad that you had good weather for the wedding. One can deal with no power for a short period of time but it gets real old after two or three days. There are so many power lines down in the region that the amount of work required is massive, so I find it difficult to complain.

      Hurricane Irene, Part Two

      A beautiful summer day in Lovell. Nothing unusual about that at the end of August except for the hum of generators throughout town. Lovell Village is in good shape (if only I had a shower in the office) but numerous sections of town are without power. Wires and poles were taken down by falling trees. Thankfully, I haven't seen any damaged cars or houses.

      I had the pleasure of driving to Portland at 2 am this morning and on the ride along RT 302 there were many miles where it was clear that there was no power. Even in Westbrook which abuts Portland. And the CMP crews were not seen (understandable since it was still windy, wet and dark). That suggests to me that Lovell and the surrounding areas might not get immediate attention.

      Over the years, one learns quickly that although you may be frustrated with not having power, there is nothing you can do. Except maybe go visit a neighbor who has one of those generators humming!

      P.S. One benefit of being on the road so early in the morning that we got back to Lovell at 5 am--just as Rosie's was opening and were her first patrons of the day!

      Hurricane Irene

      Talk about disruption! I was on Milfoil duty at the Narrows Boat Landing from 4-5 pm. Normally, that would be an easy shift but with Irene coming, boats were being taken out of the lake. And as you can see from the photo, the Kezar Lake Marina was very busy pulling boats out to safety. Camps and homes brought their lawn furniture, and anything else that could fly around, inside.

      Our daughter, Anna, is off to China for a one-year trip for language study. She is a participant in the NSLI-Y program and it is her second time traveling to China for study. Her original itinerary had her flying to Washington DC this afternoon. That flight has been cancelled for several days. The program has been trying to reschedule her (and another Maine program participant) on flights at different airports (Providence, Binghamton, Boston) without luck. We have been prepared to drive her to DC since she needs to be there for her Beijing departure on Tuesday afternoon from Dulles. We just received confirmation that she will be flying to DC tomorrow on a 10 am flight. That's the good news. The bad news is that it is from Bradley Airport, near Hartford. It will be a very early morning tomorrow and let's hope that Irene won't have washed out too many roads.

      When all is said and done with Irene and the sun shines again, will the Hurricane have lived up to its endless hype? Not sure but it is good that everyone prepared for it, including the Lovell Volunteer Fire Department. Good luck to everyone!

      Latest weather forecast for western Maine region.

      Photo of Hurricane Irene courtesy of NASA.

      Hurricane Irene

      Talk about disruption! I was on Milfoil duty at the Narrows Boat Landing from 4-5 pm. Normally, that would be an easy shift but with Irene coming, boats were being taken out of the lake. And as you can see from the photo, the Kezar Lake Marina was very busy pulling boats out to safety. Camps and homes brought their lawn furniture, and anything else that could fly around, inside.

      Our daughter, Anna, is off to China for a one-year trip for language study. She is a participant in the NSLI-Y program and it is her second time traveling to China for study. Her original itinerary had her flying to Washington DC this afternoon. That flight has been cancelled for several days. The program has been trying to reschedule her (and another Maine program participant) on flights at different airports (Providence, Binghamton, Boston) without luck. We have been prepared to drive her to DC since she needs to be there for her Beijing departure on Tuesday afternoon from Dulles. We just received confirmation that she will be flying to DC tomorrow on a 10 am flight. That's the good news. The bad news is that it is from Bradley Airport, near Hartford. It will be a very early morning tomorrow and let's hope that Irene won't have washed out too many roads.

      When all is said and done with Irene and the sun shines again, will the Hurricane have lived up to its endless hype? Not sure but it is good that everyone prepared for it, including the Lovell Volunteer Fire Department. Good luck to everyone!

      Latest weather forecast for western Maine region.

      Photo of Hurricane Irene courtesy of NASA.

      Harrison's Run by the Lake 2011

      Last night's drive from Lovell to Harrison was quite an adventure. Rain was coming down in buckets, the wind was whipping, lighting and thunder were everywhere and the National Weather Service kept interrupting the radio program with dire warnings for western Maine. I figured that there was no way the race was going to be run.

      I was surprised at the number of people who were gathered at the Harrison Town Office to register for the race. There was quite a crowd but the rain was still coming down hard and the skies were dark. Well, around 6:50, after the lighting and thunder stopped, the decision was made to start the race at its scheduled 7 pm time. The runners walked over to the start line, the police officers stopped the traffic and the race was underway.

      Two residents of Shelburne, VT were the overall male and female winners. Eric Darling, 38, had a winning time of 17:14 (5:34 pace) and Sarah Pribram, 43, finished with a time of 21:10 (6:50). There were 124 total finishers which is an extremely strong number considering the weather and the small population of the friendly village of Harrison. Overall Results

      A wonderful job was done be Race Director Tammy Anderson and Harrison Recreation Director Paula Holt.

      Next stop on the local running circuit: Lovell's Old Home Days 5k. For more info, visit: www.Lovell5k.com

      Harrison's Run by the Lake 2011

      Last night's drive from Lovell to Harrison was quite an adventure. Rain was coming down in buckets, the wind was whipping, lighting and thunder were everywhere and the National Weather Service kept interrupting the radio program with dire warnings for western Maine. I figured that there was no way the race was going to be run.

      I was surprised at the number of people who were gathered at the Harrison Town Office to register for the race. There was quite a crowd but the rain was still coming down hard and the skies were dark. Well, around 6:50, after the lighting and thunder stopped, the decision was made to start the race at its scheduled 7 pm time. The runners walked over to the start line, the police officers stopped the traffic and the race was underway.

      Two residents of Shelburne, VT were the overall male and female winners. Eric Darling, 38, had a winning time of 17:14 (5:34 pace) and Sarah Pribram, 43, finished with a time of 21:10 (6:50). There were 124 total finishers which is an extremely strong number considering the weather and the small population of the friendly village of Harrison. Overall Results

      A wonderful job was done be Race Director Tammy Anderson and Harrison Recreation Director Paula Holt.

      Next stop on the local running circuit: Lovell's Old Home Days 5k. For more info, visit: www.Lovell5k.com

      Moose Pond Ice-Out Watch

      Drove by the Moose Pond Snowman this afternoon and although the ice is melting rapidly, he seems determined to hang in there. Despite his resolve I'm not sure that he will be standing much longer. He looks so happy there, I just don't have the heart to tell him that he will be swimming soon.

      When our friend does go for his swim, I will post the official date.

      Comments

      1. Mike on

        How much ice is out there now id like to snowmobile

        Moose Pond Ice-Out Watch

        Drove by the Moose Pond Snowman this afternoon and although the ice is melting rapidly, he seems determined to hang in there. Despite his resolve I'm not sure that he will be standing much longer. He looks so happy there, I just don't have the heart to tell him that he will be swimming soon.

        When our friend does go for his swim, I will post the official date.

        Ice Out

        I'm not sure who makes the final determination for the official ice-out date every year but it is an annual event that helps to mark the passage from winter to spring. Maine's Department of Conservation says that ice-out is "...to be when you can navigate unimpeded from one end of the water body to the other. There may still be ice in coves or along the shoreline but when a person can traverse the entire water body without being stopped by ice flows, we will consider the ice to be out." Records have been kept for many years and you quickly see that the dates jump around quite a bit from year-to-year. Follow the link to Kezar Lake's records on this United States Geological Survey page.

        Just how does the ice melt anyway?

        Ice-out also is used for fund-raising purposes. A local favorite, Frosty, is on Moose Pond in Bridgton and can be seen from the Route 302 causeway. New this year is the Town of Naples Causeway Restoration Committee. For both of these contests, you must select the correct date to win 1/2 of the proceeds that are collected. I've also heard of restaurants providing the winner with a free meal and I'm sure there are other fun contests out there!

        Thanks to the Midge Silvio, Stoneham's Town Clerk, for this Ice-Out request from the State of Maine.

        Ice Out

        I'm not sure who makes the final determination for the official ice-out date every year but it is an annual event that helps to mark the passage from winter to spring. Maine's Department of Conservation says that ice-out is "...to be when you can navigate unimpeded from one end of the water body to the other. There may still be ice in coves or along the shoreline but when a person can traverse the entire water body without being stopped by ice flows, we will consider the ice to be out." Records have been kept for many years and you quickly see that the dates jump around quite a bit from year-to-year. Follow the link to Kezar Lake's records on this United States Geological Survey page.

        Just how does the ice melt anyway?

        Ice-out also is used for fund-raising purposes. A local favorite, Frosty, is on Moose Pond in Bridgton and can be seen from the Route 302 causeway. New this year is the Town of Naples Causeway Restoration Committee. For both of these contests, you must select the correct date to win 1/2 of the proceeds that are collected. I've also heard of restaurants providing the winner with a free meal and I'm sure there are other fun contests out there!

        Thanks to the Midge Silvio, Stoneham's Town Clerk, for this Ice-Out request from the State of Maine.